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Int J Clin Exp Pathol. 2013 Oct 15;6(11):2412-8. eCollection 2013.

In vivo biocompatibility of the PLGA microparticles in parotid gland.

Author information

1
CIMA, Department of Integral Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Doctoral Program in Morphological Science, Universidad de La Frontera Temuco, Chile ; Center of Research in Biomedical Sciences, Universidad Autónoma de Chile Temuco, Chile.

Abstract

Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles are used in various disorders for the controlled or sustained release of drugs, with the management of salivary gland pathologies possible using this technology. There is no record of the response to such microparticles in the glandular parenchyma. The purpose of this study was to assess the morphological changes in the parotid gland when injected with a single dose of PLGA microparticles. We used 12 adult female Sprague Dawley rats (Rattus norvegicus) that were injected into their right parotid gland with sterile vehicle solution (G1, n=4), 0.5 mg PLGA microparticles (G2, n=4), and 0.75 mg PLGA microparticles (G3, n=4); the microparticles were dissolved in a sterile vehicle solution. The intercalar and striated ducts lumen, the thickness of the acini and the histology aspect in terms of the parenchyma organization, cell morphology of acini and duct system, the presence of polymeric residues, and inflammatory response were determined at 14 days post-injection. The administration of the compound in a single dose modified some of the morphometric parameters of parenchyma (intercalar duct lumen and thickness of the glandular acini) but did not induce tissue inflammatory response, despite the visible presence of polymer waste. This suggests that PLGA microparticles are biocompatible with the parotid tissue, making it possible to use intraglandular controlled drug administration.

KEYWORDS:

PLGA; Salivary glands; drug delivery; microparticles; parotid gland

PMID:
24228103
PMCID:
PMC3816810
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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