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Clin Implant Dent Relat Res. 2015 Aug;17(4):771-8. doi: 10.1111/cid.12170. Epub 2013 Nov 14.

Clinical Factors Influencing Removal of the Cement Excess in Implant-Supported Restorations.

Author information

1
Vilnius Research Group, Vilnius, Lithuania.
2
Vilnius Implantology Center, Vilnius, Lithuania.
3
Institute of Odontology, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius University, Vilnius, Lithuania.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The depth of the cementation margin has an influence on the amount of cement remnants around implants. However, the role of other clinical factors is still not clarified.

PURPOSE:

The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between undetected cement and (i) location of the implant, (ii) implant diameter, and (iii) undercut.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Sixty-five patients were treated with single metal-ceramic restorations on implants. The undercut between the restoration and the tissue was measured. After cementation, the restoration-abutment unit was unscrewed. All quadrants of the specimens were photographed and analyzed. The ratio between total restoration area/peri-implant tissue area and area of cement remnants was calculated in pixels. Significance was set to 0.05.

RESULTS:

Sixty-five metal-ceramic restorations were placed on 65 implants (39 molars, 22 premolars, 4 anteriors; 21 implants had a diameter of 3.5 mm, 34 of 4.0 mm, 10 of 5.0 mm). An undercut of 1 mm was found in 118 sites, 2 mm in 96 sites, and 3 mm in 46. The percentages of soft tissue and restoration, respectively, covered by cement were as follows: molars 4% and 7%; premolars 3.8% and 7.3%; anteriors 3% and 3.4%; 3.5 mm diameter 3.3% and 7.4%; 4.0 mm 7.7% and 7.7%; 5.0 mm 3.9% and 2.1%; 1-mm undercut 3.5% and 5.4%; 2-mm 4% and 8.1%; 3-mm 4.8% and 8.4%. The relationship between amount of cement remnants and implant location was insignificant (p > 0.05) for both soft tissue and the specimen, but significant relationships with amount of cement remnants were found for diameter (p = 0.026 for soft tissue, p = 0.600 for specimen) and undercut (p = 0.004 for soft tissue, p = 0.046 for specimen).

CONCLUSION:

If cemented crown restoration is desired, undercuts should be reduced to a minimum for better removal of cement excess, irrespective of the diameter and location of the implants in the mouth.

KEYWORDS:

cement cleaning; cement excess; cement-related peri-implantitis; cement-retained implant restorations; implant diameter; undercut

PMID:
24224895
DOI:
10.1111/cid.12170
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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