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Planta. 1988 Nov;176(2):196-204. doi: 10.1007/BF00392445.

Acquisition of embryogenic potential in carrot cell-suspension cultures.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Biology, Agricultural University Wageningen, De Dreijen 11, NL-6703 BC, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Embryogenic suspension cultures of domesticated carrot (Daucus carota L.) are characterized by the presence of proembryogenic masses (PEMs) from which somatic embryos develop under conditions of low cell density in the absence of phytohormones. A culture system, referred to as starting cultures, was developed that allowed analysis of the emergence of PEMs in newly initiated hypocotyl-derived suspension cultures. Embryogenic potential, reflected by the number of FEMs present, slowly increased in starting cultures over a period of six weeks. Addition of excreted, high-molecular-weight, heat-labile cell factors from an established embryogenic culture considerably accelerated the acquisition of embryogenic potential in starting cultures. Analysis of [(35)S]methionine-labeled proteins excreted into the medium revealed distinct changes concomitant with the acquisition of embryogenic potential in these cultures. Analysis of the pattern of gene expression by in-vitro translation of total cellular mRNA from starting cultures with different embryogenic potential and subsequent separation of the [(35)S]methionine-labeled products by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated a small number of abundant in-vitro-translation products to be present in somatic embryos and in embryogenic cells but absent in nonembryogenic cells. Several other in-vitro-translation products were present in explants, non-embryogenic and embryogenic cells but were absent in somatic embryos. Hybridization of an embryoregulated complementary-DNA sequence, Dc3, to RNA extracted from starting cultures showed that the corresponding gene is expressed in somatic embryos and PEMs but not in non-embryogenic cells.

PMID:
24220773
DOI:
10.1007/BF00392445

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