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JAMA Neurol. 2014 Jan;71(1):83-7. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.4749.

Long-term clinical outcome of fetal cell transplantation for Parkinson disease: two case reports.

Author information

1
Sobell Department of Motor Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, England.
2
Department of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London, England.
3
Reta Lila Weston Laboratories and Department of Molecular Neuroscience, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, England.
4
Division of Neurology, Department of Clinical Sciences, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
5
Division of Neurology, Department of Clinical Sciences, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden5Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Clinical Sciences, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
6
Neuronal Survival Unit, Wallenberg Neuroscience Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
7
Neuronal Survival Unit, Wallenberg Neuroscience Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden7Neurobiology Unit, Wallenberg Neuroscience Center, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.

Abstract

IMPORTANCE:

Recent advances in stem cell technologies have rekindled an interest in the use of cell replacement strategies for patients with Parkinson disease. This study reports the very long-term clinical outcomes of fetal cell transplantation in 2 patients with Parkinson disease. Such long-term follow-up data can usefully inform on the potential efficacy of this approach, as well as the design of trials for its further evaluation.

OBSERVATIONS:

Two patients received intrastriatal grafts of human fetal ventral mesencephalic tissue, rich in dopaminergic neuroblasts, as restorative treatment for their Parkinson disease. To evaluate the very long-term efficacy of the grafts, clinical assessments were performed 18 and 15 years posttransplantation. Motor improvements gained gradually over the first postoperative years were sustained up to 18 years posttransplantation, while both patients have discontinued, and remained free of any, pharmacological dopaminergic therapy.

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE:

The results from these 2 cases indicate that dopaminergic cell transplantation can offer very long-term symptomatic relief in patients with Parkinson disease and provide proof-of-concept support for future clinical trials using fetal or stem cell therapies.

PMID:
24217017
PMCID:
PMC4235249
DOI:
10.1001/jamaneurol.2013.4749
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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