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Vet Microbiol. 2014 Jan 10;168(1):8-15. doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2013.10.002. Epub 2013 Oct 22.

Molecular characterization of canine coronavirus strains circulating in Brazil.

Author information

1
Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Instituto Biomédico, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Prof. Hernani Melo, 101, CEP 24210-130 Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
2
Departamento de Microbiologia e Parasitologia, Instituto Biomédico, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rua Prof. Hernani Melo, 101, CEP 24210-130 Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Electronic address: ritacubel@id.uff.br.

Abstract

To characterize canine coronavirus (CCoV) circulating in diarrheic puppies in Brazil, 250 fecal samples collected between 2006 and 2012 were tested. By using RT-PCR to partially amplify the M gene, CCoV RNA was detected in 30 samples. Sequence analysis of the M protein grouped eight strains with CCoV-I and another 19 with CCoV-II prototypes. To genotype/subtype the CCoV strains and assess the occurrence of single or multiple CCoV infections, RT-PCR of the S gene was performed, and 25/30 CCoV-positive strains amplified with one or two primer pairs. For 17/25 samples, single infections were detected as follows: six CCoV-I, nine CCoV-IIa and two CCoV-IIb. Eight samples were positive for more than one genotype/subtype as follows: seven CCoV-I/IIa and one CCoV-I/IIb. Sequence analysis revealed that the CCoV-I and IIa strains shared high genetic similarity to each other and to the prototypes. The Brazilian strains of CCoV-IIb displayed an aminoacid insertion that was also described in CCoV-IIb-UCD-1 and TGEV strains. Among the 25 CCoV-positive puppies, five had a fatal outcome, all but one of which were cases of mixed infection. The current study is the first reported molecular characterization of CCoV-I, IIa and IIb strains in Brazil.

KEYWORDS:

Brazil; Canine coronavirus; Enteritis; Genotype; Subtype

PMID:
24216489
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetmic.2013.10.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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