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J Adolesc Health. 2014 Apr;54(4):449-53. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.09.012. Epub 2013 Nov 8.

Do risky friends change the efficacy of a primary care brief intervention for adolescent alcohol use?

Author information

1
Craig Dalsimer Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
2
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Center for Adolescent Substance Abuse Research, Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts.
3
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Center for Adolescent Substance Abuse Research, Division of Developmental Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Division of Adolescent/Young Adult Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: sion.harris@childrens.harvard.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To determine if peer risk (having friends who drink or approve of drinking) modifies the effects of a computer-facilitated screening and provider brief advice (cSBA) intervention on adolescent alcohol use.

METHODS:

We assessed the intervention effect using logistic regression modeling with generalized estimating equations on a sample of 2,092 adolescents. Effect modification by peer risk was analyzed separately for alcohol initiation (drinking at follow-up in baseline nondrinkers) and cessation (no drinking at follow-up in baseline drinkers) by testing an interaction term (treatment condition by peer risk). Interpretation of the interaction effect was further clarified by subsequent stratification by peer risk.

RESULTS:

The intervention effect on alcohol cessation was significantly greater among those with peer risk (adjusted relative risk ratios; risk 1.44, 1.18-1.76 vs. no risk .98, .41-2.36) at 3 months' follow-up. There was no such finding for alcohol initiation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Alcohol screening and brief provider counseling may differentially benefit adolescent drinkers with drinking friends.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Alcohol use; Peer risk; Prevention

PMID:
24216313
PMCID:
PMC3965615
DOI:
10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.09.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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