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Am J Surg. 2014 Feb;207(2):226-30. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2013.10.007. Epub 2013 Oct 24.

Hand motion patterns of Fundamentals of Laparoscopic Surgery certified and noncertified surgeons.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7211, USA.
2
Department of Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7211, USA. Electronic address: robert_watson@med.unc.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

With the increasing use of simulation in surgical training there is an increasing need for low cost methods of objective assessment.

METHODS:

Hand-motion data (3 degrees of freedom) were acquired using microelectromechanical gyroscope tracking devices worn on both hands during an intracorporeal suture/knot-tying laparoscopic task performed by FLS-certified and non-FLS-certified surgeons. Each data sample was processed into a symbolic time series, and the Lempel-Ziv complexity metric was calculated for each hand for the whole task and the first 60 seconds of the task from the dominant hand.

RESULTS:

FLS-certified surgeons had more complex hand-motion patterns. This was statistically significant only for the dominant hand (P = .02) but was still statistically significant when calculated from the first 60 seconds of the task (P = .04) and therefore independent of the total time taken to complete the task.

CONCLUSIONS:

Hand-motion patterns were quantified and shown to be different between FLS-certified and non-FLS-certified surgeons using low-cost microelectromechanical technology and the Lempel-Ziv complexity metric.

KEYWORDS:

Basic technical skills; Computer-assisted feedback; Motion analysis; Surgical education

PMID:
24216188
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjsurg.2013.10.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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