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Dev Cogn Neurosci. 2013 Oct;6:162-75. doi: 10.1016/j.dcn.2013.10.001. Epub 2013 Oct 14.

Fractionating the neural correlates of individual working memory components underlying arithmetic problem solving skills in children.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Electronic address: arron@stanford.edu.

Abstract

Baddeley and Hitch's multi-component working memory (WM) model has played an enduring and influential role in our understanding of cognitive abilities. Very little is known, however, about the neural basis of this multi-component WM model and the differential role each component plays in mediating arithmetic problem solving abilities in children. Here, we investigate the neural basis of the central executive (CE), phonological (PL) and visuo-spatial (VS) components of WM during a demanding mental arithmetic task in 7-9 year old children (N=74). The VS component was the strongest predictor of math ability in children and was associated with increased arithmetic complexity-related responses in left dorsolateral and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortices as well as bilateral intra-parietal sulcus and supramarginal gyrus in posterior parietal cortex. Critically, VS, CE and PL abilities were associated with largely distinct patterns of brain response. Overlap between VS and CE components was observed in left supramarginal gyrus and no overlap was observed between VS and PL components. Our findings point to a central role of visuo-spatial WM during arithmetic problem-solving in young grade-school children and highlight the usefulness of the multi-component Baddeley and Hitch WM model in fractionating the neural correlates of arithmetic problem solving during development.

KEYWORDS:

Arithmetic cognition; Central executive; Development; Individual differences; Visuo-spatial; Working memory; fMRI

PMID:
24212504
PMCID:
PMC3871177
DOI:
10.1016/j.dcn.2013.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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