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Nitric Oxide. 2014 Jan 30;36:31-5. doi: 10.1016/j.niox.2013.10.012. Epub 2013 Nov 7.

Total salivary nitrates and nitrites in oral health and periodontal disease.

Author information

1
Biophysics Unit, School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, Marcelo T de Alvear 2142 (1122AAH), Buenos Aires, Argentina. Electronic address: gabriel@odon.uba.ar.
2
Pharmacology Unit, School of Dentistry, University of Buenos Aires, Marcelo T de Alvear 2142 (1122AAH), Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Abstract

It is well known that nitrites are increased in saliva from patients with periodontal disease. In the oral cavity, nitrites may derive partly from the reduction of nitrates by oral bacteria. Nitrates have been reported as a defence-related mechanism. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the salivary levels of total nitrate and nitrite and their relationship, in unstimulated and stimulated saliva from periodontal healthy subjects, and from patients with chronic periodontal disease. Nitrates and nitrites were determined in saliva from thirty healthy subjects and forty-four patients with periodontal disease. A significant increase in salivary nitrates and nitrites was observed. Nitrates and nitrites concentration was related to clinical attachment level (CAL). A positive and significant Pearson's correlation was found between salivary total nitrates and nitrites. Periodontal treatment induced clinical improvement and decreased nitrates and nitrites. It is concluded that salivary nitrates and nitrites increase, in patients with periodontal disease, could be related to defence mechanisms. The possibility that the salivary glands respond to oral infectious diseases by increasing nitrate secretion should be explored further.

KEYWORDS:

Periodontal disease; Salivary nitrates; Salivary nitrites

PMID:
24211765
DOI:
10.1016/j.niox.2013.10.012
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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