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Physiotherapy. 2014 Sep;100(3):228-34. doi: 10.1016/j.physio.2013.08.006. Epub 2013 Oct 3.

Efficacy of a static progressive stretch device as an adjunct to physical therapy in treating adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder: a prospective, randomised study.

Author information

1
Physical Therapy Department, Health Professions Division, College of Health Care Sciences, Nova Southeastern University, Fort-Lauderdale-Davie, USA; Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy Department, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. Electronic address: msrt78@aol.com.
2
Physical Therapy Department, Health Professions Division, College of Health Care Sciences, Nova Southeastern University, Fort-Lauderdale-Davie, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Stress relaxation and static progressive stretch are techniques used for non-surgical restoration of shoulder range of motion for patients with adhesive capsulitis.

OBJECTIVES:

To compare a static progressive stretch device plus traditional therapy with traditional therapy alone for the treatment of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder.

DESIGN:

Prospective, randomised controlled trial.

PARTICIPANTS:

Sixty patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder were assigned at random to an experimental group or a control group.

INTERVENTIONS:

Both groups received three traditional therapy sessions per week for 4 weeks. In addition, the experimental group used a static progressive stretch device for 4 weeks.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The primary outcome measure was shoulder range of motion (active and passive shoulder abduction, and passive shoulder external rotation). The secondary outcome measures were function [measured by the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire] and pain [measured using a visual analogue scale (VAS)].

RESULTS:

At baseline, there were no differences between the two groups. However, after the intervention, there were significant (P<0.05) differences between the groups for all outcome parameters: 0.3 for mean VAS scores [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.6 to 1.1], -10.1 for DASH scores (95% CI -21.0 to 0.9), 21.2° for shoulder passive external rotation (95% CI 16.8 to 25.7), 26.4° for shoulder passive abduction (95% CI 17.4 to 35.3), and 27.7° for shoulder active abduction (95% CI 20.3 to 35.0). At 12-month follow-up, the differences between the groups were maintained and even increased for mean shoulder range of motion, VAS scores and DASH scores, with significant differences (P<0.001) between the groups: -2.0 for VAS scores (95% CI -2.9 to -1.2), -53.8 for DASH scores (95% CI -64.7 to -42.9), 47.9° for shoulder passive external rotation (95% CI 43.5 to 52.3), 44.9° for shoulder passive abduction (95% CI 36.0 to 53.8), and 94.3° for shoulder active abduction (95% CI 87.0 to 101.7).

CONCLUSION:

Use of a static progressive stretch device in combination with traditional therapy appears to have beneficial long-term effects on shoulder range of motion, pain and functional outcomes in patients with adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. At 12-month follow-up, the experimental group had continued to improve, while the control group had relapsed.

KEYWORDS:

Frozen shoulder; Mobilisation; SPS; Shoulder adhesive capsulitis; Static progressive stretch orthosis; Stiff shoulder

PMID:
24211154
DOI:
10.1016/j.physio.2013.08.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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