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Patient Educ Couns. 2014 Jan;94(1):83-9. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2013.09.005. Epub 2013 Sep 17.

Satisfaction with treatment decision-making and treatment regret among Latinas and non-Latina whites with DCIS.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA; Medical Effectiveness Research Center for Diverse Populations, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA; Center for Aging in Diverse Communities, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.
2
Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA; Medical Effectiveness Research Center for Diverse Populations, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA; Center for Aging in Diverse Communities, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.
3
Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA.
5
Department of Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA; Medical Effectiveness Research Center for Diverse Populations, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA. Electronic address: leah.karliner@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine differences in treatment decision-making participation, satisfaction, and regret among Latinas and non-Latina whites with DCIS.

METHODS:

Survey of Latina and non-Latina white women diagnosed with DCIS. We assessed women's preferences for involvement in decision-making, primary treatment decision maker, and participatory decision-making. We examined primary outcomes of satisfaction with treatment decision-making and treatment regret by ethnic-language group.

RESULTS:

Among 745 participants (349 Latinas, 396 white) Spanish-speaking Latinas (SSL) had the highest mean preference for involvement in decision-making score and the lowest mean participatory decision-making score and were more likely to defer their final treatment decision to their physicians than English-speaking Latinas or whites (26%, 13%, 18%, p<0.05). SSLs reported lower satisfaction with treatment decision-making (OR 0.4; CI 95%, 0.2-0.8) and expressed more regret than whites (OR 6.2; CI 95%, 3.0-12.4). More participatory decision-making increased the odds of satisfaction (OR 1.5; CI 95%, 1.3-1.8) and decreased the odds of treatment regret (OR 0.8; CI 95%, 0.7-1.0), independent of ethnicity-language.

CONCLUSION:

Language barriers impede the establishment of decision-making partnerships between Latinas and their physicians, and result in less satisfaction with the decision-making process and more treatment regret.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Use of professional interpreters may address communication-related disparities for these women.

KEYWORDS:

Decision-making; Doctor–patient communication; Ductal carcinoma in situ; Health disparities; Language barriers; Latina health

PMID:
24207116
PMCID:
PMC3918475
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2013.09.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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