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Am J Cardiol. 2014 Jan 1;113(1):60-3. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.09.017. Epub 2013 Oct 3.

Comparison of outcomes for patients ≥75 years of age treated with pre-hospital reduced-dose fibrinolysis followed by percutaneous coronary intervention versus percutaneous coronary intervention alone for treatment of ST-elevation myocardial infarction.

Author information

1
University of Texas Health Science Center and Memorial Hermann Heart and Vascular Institute, Houston, Texas.
2
University of Texas Health Science Center and Memorial Hermann Heart and Vascular Institute, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: h.v.anderson@uth.tmc.edu.

Abstract

A coordinated system of care for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions that includes prehospital administration of reduced-dose fibrinolytic agents coupled with urgent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), termed FAST-PCI, has been shown to be at least as effective as primary PCI (PPCI) alone. However, this reduced-dose fibrinolytic strategy could be associated with increased bleeding risk, especially in elderly patients. The purpose of this study was to examine 30-day outcomes in patients aged ≥75 years with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions treated with either strategy. Data from 120 patients aged ≥75 years treated with FAST-PCI were compared with those of 94 patients aged ≥75 years treated with PPCI. The primary comparator was mortality at 30 days. Stroke, reinfarction, and major bleeding were also compared. The groups were well matched for age, cardiac risk factors, and ischemic times. At 30 days, mortality was lower with FAST-PCI than with PPCI (4.2% vs 18.1%, p <0.01). Rates of stroke, reinfarction, and major bleeding (4% vs 2%) were similar in the 2 groups. The FAST-PCI cohort had lower rates of cardiogenic shock on hospital arrival (15% vs 26%, p = 0.05) and completely occluded infarct arteries (Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction [TIMI] grade 0 flow, 35% vs 61%, p <0.01). In conclusion, for patients aged ≥75 years with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions, a FAST-PCI strategy in a coordinated system of care was associated with reduced 30-day mortality, earlier infarct artery patency, and lower incidence of cardiogenic shock at arrival compared with PPCI, without apparent bleeding, stroke, or reinfarction penalties.

PMID:
24207074
DOI:
10.1016/j.amjcard.2013.09.017
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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