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Int J Sports Med. 2014 May;35(5):418-23. doi: 10.1055/s-0033-1353214. Epub 2013 Nov 7.

Effectiveness of Tai-Chi for decreasing acute pain in fibromyalgia patients.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Education and Sports, School of Sport Sciences, University of Granada, Spain.
2
Department of Physiology and Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy and School of Sports -Sciences, University of Granada, Spain.

Abstract

Tai-Chi has shown benefits in physical and psychological outcomes in diverse populations. We aimed to determine the changes elicited by a Tai-Chi program (12 and 24 weeks) in acute pain (before vs. after session) in fibromyalgia patients. We also assessed the cumulative changes in pain brought about by a Tai-Chi program. Thirty-six patients (29 women) with fibromyalgia participated in a low-moderate intensity Tai-Chi program for 12 weeks (3 sessions/week). Twenty-eight patients (27 women) continued the program for an additional 12 weeks (i. e., 24 weeks). We assessed pain by means of a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) before and after each single session (i. e., 72 sessions). We observed significant immediate changes (P-values from 0.037 to 0.0001) with an approximately 12% mean decrease of acute pain in the comparison of VAS-values before and after each session (72 sessions in total), with the exception of 4 sessions. We observed significant changes in cumulative pain pre-session (95% CI=-0.019; -0.014; P<0.001) and cumulative pain post-session (95% CI=-0.021; -0.015; P<0.001) along the 24-week intervention only. In conclusion, a low-moderate intensity Tai-Chi program for 12 weeks (3 times/week) decreased levels of acute pain in fibromyalgia patients. A longer period is necessary (e. g. 24 weeks) for observing cumulative changes in pain.

PMID:
24203799
DOI:
10.1055/s-0033-1353214
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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