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J Sci Med Sport. 2014 Nov;17(6):656-61. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2013.09.011. Epub 2013 Oct 17.

Cardiometabolic and behavioural risk factors in young overweight women identified with simple anthropometric measures.

Author information

1
School of Exercise Science, Australian Catholic University, Australia. Electronic address: bianca.share@acu.edu.au.
2
School of Exercise Science, Australian Catholic University, Australia.
3
School of Exercise Science, Australian Catholic University, Australia; Laboratory of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, University of Avignon, France.
4
Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed to (1) investigate cardiometabolic risk markers in young women (18-30 years) with overweight/obesity, and (2) establish whether the measures of waist circumference and body mass index possess similar associations of cardiometabolic risk.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional.

METHODS:

Cardiometabolic risk factors including, anthropometric, metabolic syndrome markers, biochemical, and other health/fitness indicators were assessed in women when classified as overweight/obese by waist circumference [waist circumference 91.9 ± 10.1 cm, age 22.3 ± 3.5 years, n = 38] versus control [n = 30, waist circumference 71.4 ± 3.5 cm, age 20.1 ± 0.9 years], and when classified by body mass index [n=35, body mass index 32.2 ± 5.2 kg m(2), age 22.5 ± 3.6 years] versus control [body mass index 21.7 ± 1.9 kg m(2), age 20.1 ± 0.9 years, n=33].

RESULTS:

Compared with controls, women with overweight/obesity (classified by waist circumference or body mass index) displayed elevated body mass, systolic blood pressure and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and reduced estimated [Formula: see text] and weekly physical activity, with no differences in self-reported energy intake. The unadjusted odds ratio of being classified with overweight/obesity and an elevated homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and/or less than recommended physical activity ranged between 5.1 and 10.0. Receiver operator characteristic curves indicated waist circumference, body mass index and waist-to-height ratio cut-off points of ≥ 84.2 cm, ≥ 30.6 kg m(-2) and ≥ 0.5, respectively, for homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and ≥ 80.6 cm, ≥ 25.2 kg m(-2) and ≥ 0.46, respectively, for less than recommended physical activity.

CONCLUSIONS:

Waist circumference and body mass index have similar associations with cardiometabolic risk, with greater homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance and lower physical activity, rather than differences in traditional metabolic syndrome markers, observed in young women with overweight/obesity.

KEYWORDS:

Body mass index; Cardiovascular disease; Obese; Physical activity; Waist circumference; Waist-to-height ratio

PMID:
24200930
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsams.2013.09.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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