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Am J Health Promot. 2014 Jul-Aug;28(6):389-96. doi: 10.4278/ajhp.130207-QUAN-64. Epub 2013 Nov 7.

Relationship between employment characteristics and obesity among employed U.S. adults.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This study examined associations between employment characteristics and obesity among a sample representing civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. adults.

DESIGN:

Quantitative, cross-sectional study.

SETTING:

Workplace.

SUBJECTS:

The 2010 National Health Interview Survey data for 15,121 employed adults (≥18 years).

MEASURES:

The outcome variable was weight status, and exposure variables were employment characteristics (number of employees, work hours, paid by the hour, paid sick leave, and health insurance offered).

ANALYSIS:

Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for employment characteristics associated with obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) after controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, education, family income, fruit/vegetable intake, physical activity, smoking, and occupations.

RESULTS:

Nationwide, 28% of employed adults were obese. From multivariate logistic regression, the odds of being obese was significantly greater among adults who worked at a company with 100 to 499 employees (OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.02-1.39) vs. with 1 to 24 employees and those who worked >50 hours/week (OR  = 1.32, 95% CI  = 1.05-1.65) vs. <30 hours/week.

CONCLUSION:

Approximately 3 out of 10 employees were obese and 6 out of 10 were overweight or obese. A better understanding of why these employment characteristics are associated with obesity could help employers better develop and target interventions for obesity prevention and treatment in the worksites.

KEYWORDS:

Adults; Employees; Employment; Obesity; Prevention Research. Manuscript format: research; Research purpose: relationship testing; Study design: quantitative; Outcome measure: obesity; Setting: workplace; Health focus: modify employment characteristics; Strategy: education; United States; Weight Status; Workplace; Worksite; built environment; incentives; Target population: adults; Target population circumstances: employees

PMID:
24200331
PMCID:
PMC4494781
DOI:
10.4278/ajhp.130207-QUAN-64
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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