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Environ Microbiol. 2014 Aug;16(8):2623-2634. doi: 10.1111/1462-2920.12322. Epub 2013 Nov 28.

Non-native acylated homoserine lactones reveal that LuxIR quorum sensing promotes symbiont stability.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1550 Linden Drive, Madison WI 53706.
2
Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Avenue, Madison WI 53706.
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Contributed equally

Abstract

Quorum sensing, a group behaviour coordinated by a diffusible pheromone signal and a cognate receptor, is typical of bacteria that form symbioses with plants and animals. LuxIR-type N-acyl L-homoserine (AHL) quorum sensing is common in Gram-negative Proteobacteria, and many members of this group have additional quorum-sensing networks. The bioluminescent symbiont Vibrio fischeri encodes two AHL signal synthases: AinS and LuxI. AinS-dependent quorum sensing converges with LuxI-dependent quorum sensing at the LuxR regulatory element. Both AinS- and LuxI-mediated signalling are required for efficient and persistent colonization of the squid host, Euprymna scolopes. The basis of the mutualism is symbiont bioluminescence, which is regulated by both LuxI- and AinS-dependent quorum sensing, and is essential for maintaining a colonization of the host. Here, we used chemical and genetic approaches to probe the dynamics of LuxI- and AinS-mediated regulation of bioluminescence during symbiosis. We demonstrate that both native AHLs and non-native AHL analogues can be used to non-invasively and specifically modulate induction of symbiotic bioluminescence via LuxI-dependent quorum sensing. Our data suggest that the first day of colonization, during which symbiont bioluminescence is induced by LuxIR, is a critical period that determines the stability of the V. fischeri population once symbiosis is established.

PMID:
24191970
PMCID:
PMC4010582
DOI:
10.1111/1462-2920.12322
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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