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Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2014 Apr;231(8):1455-65. doi: 10.1007/s00213-013-3326-z. Epub 2013 Nov 5.

Worth the wait: effects of age of onset of marijuana use on white matter and impulsivity.

Author information

1
Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Core, McLean Imaging Center, McLean Hospital, 115 Mill St, Belmont, MA, 02478, USA, gruber@mclean.harvard.edu.

Abstract

RATIONALE:

Marijuana (MJ) use continues to rise, and as the perceived risk of using MJ approaches an all-time historic low, initiation of MJ use is occurring at even younger ages. As adolescence is a critical period of neuromaturation, teens and emerging adults are at greater risk for experiencing the negative effects of MJ on the brain. In particular, MJ use has been shown to be associated with alterations in frontal white matter microstructure, which may be related to reports of increased levels of impulsivity in this population.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between age of onset of MJ use, white matter microstructure, and reported impulsivity in chronic, heavy MJ smokers.

METHODS:

Twenty-five MJ smokers and 18 healthy controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging and completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale. MJ smokers were also divided into early onset (regular use prior to age 16) and late onset (age 16 or later) groups in order to clarify the impact of age of onset of MJ use on these variables.

RESULTS:

MJ smokers exhibited significantly reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) relative to controls, as well as higher levels of impulsivity. Earlier MJ onset was also associated with lower levels of FA. Interestingly, within the early onset group, higher impulsivity scores were correlated with lower FA, a relationship that was not observed in the late onset smokers.

CONCLUSIONS:

MJ use is associated with white matter development and reported impulsivity, particularly in early onset smokers.

PMID:
24190588
PMCID:
PMC3967072
DOI:
10.1007/s00213-013-3326-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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