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Sci Total Environ. 2014 Feb 1;470-471:726-32. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.09.088. Epub 2013 Oct 30.

Bisphenol A and cardiometabolic risk factors in obese children.

Author information

1
3123 Research Blvd, Suite #200, Center for Global Health, Department of Community Health, Boonshoft School of Medicine, Wright State, University, Dayton, OH, USA. Electronic address: naila.khalil@wright.edu.
2
The Pediatric Lipid Clinic, the Children's Medical Center of Dayton, One Children's Plaza, Dayton, OH 45404, USA. Electronic address: James.Ebert@wright.edu.
3
Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12201-0509, USA.
4
231 Albert Sabin Way, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45267-0575, USA. Electronic address: Scott.Belcher@uc.edu.
5
Community Health and Pediatrics, Wright State University, 3171 Research Blvd. Dayton, OH 45420-4006, USA. Electronic address: miryoung.lee@wright.edu.
6
Community Health, Wright State University, 3171 Research Blvd. Dayton, OH 45420, USA. Electronic address: stefan.czerwinski@wright.edu.
7
Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health Sciences, State University of New York, Albany, NY 12201-0509, USA. Electronic address: kkannan@wadsworth.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Bisphenol-A (BPA) is an endocrine disruptor (ED) that has been associated with obesity and metabolic changes in liver in humans. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects 40% of all obese children in the United States. Association of BPA with NAFLD in children is poorly understood. We investigated if BPA might play a role.

METHODS:

In a cross sectional study of 39 obese and overweight children aged 3-8 years enrolled from the Children Medical Center of Dayton, Ohio, anthropometric, clinical and biochemical assessment of serum samples were conducted. Urinary BPA was measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and was adjusted for urinary creatinine BPA (creatinine) using linear regression and spline analyses.

RESULTS:

Higher urinary BPA (creatinine) concentration in overweight and obese children was associated with increasing free thyroxine. In male children BPA (creatinine) decreased with age, and was associated with elevated liver enzyme aspartate aminotransferase and diastolic blood pressure. The association of BPA (creatinine) persisted even after adjusting for age and ethnicity. Also in males, BPA concentration unadjusted for creatinine was significantly associated with serum fasting insulin and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) showing non-monotonic exposure-response relationship.

CONCLUSION:

Urinary BPA in obese children, at least in males is associated with adverse liver and metabolic effects, and high diastolic blood pressure.

KEYWORDS:

Bisphenol A; Childhood obesity; Endocrine disruptor; Non-monotonic dose response; Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease; Spline analysis

PMID:
24184549
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.09.088
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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