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Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 Jan;37(1):1-9. doi: 10.1016/j.cimid.2013.10.002. Epub 2013 Oct 14.

Vaccination using phase I vaccine is effective to control Coxiella burnetii shedding in infected dairy cattle herds.

Author information

1
INRA, UMR1300 Biologie, Epidémiologie et Analyse de Risque en santé animale, BP 40706, F-44307 Nantes, France; LUNAM Université, Oniris, Ecole nationale vétérinaire, agroalimentaire et de l'alimentation Nantes-Atlantique, UMR BioEpAR, F-44307 Nantes, France; Union Bretonne des Groupements de Défense Sanitaire, F-56000 Vannes, France. Electronic address: annefrieda.taurel@gmail.com.
2
INRA, UMR1300 Biologie, Epidémiologie et Analyse de Risque en santé animale, BP 40706, F-44307 Nantes, France; LUNAM Université, Oniris, Ecole nationale vétérinaire, agroalimentaire et de l'alimentation Nantes-Atlantique, UMR BioEpAR, F-44307 Nantes, France.
3
Union Bretonne des Groupements de Défense Sanitaire, F-56000 Vannes, France.

Abstract

The effectiveness of the vaccination of dairy cows combined or not with antibiotics (i.e. oxytetracycline) to control Coxiella burnetii (Cb) shedding at herd level was investigated in 77 Q fever clinically affected herds. In addition to nulliparous heifers' vaccination, one out of the four following medical strategies was randomly assigned to dairy cows in each herd: vaccination (using a phase I vaccine) alone, vaccination combined with oxytetracycline, oxytetracycline alone or nothing. Their effectiveness to reduce Cb load in quarterly samples of bulk tank milk (BTM) and of pooled milk of primiparous (MP) was assessed through logistic hierarchical models. A significant reduction in Cb load was observed in herds where the vaccination of ≥80% of dairy cows was implemented; whereas the use of antibiotics was uneffective. Our findings support the interest of a whole vaccination strategy and provide evidence for decreasing the use of antibiotics in dairy cattle herds.

KEYWORDS:

Coxiella burnetii; Dairy herds; Milk; Oxytetracycline; Shedding; Vaccination

PMID:
24184019
DOI:
10.1016/j.cimid.2013.10.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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