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J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2014 Aug;148(2):416-21.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.jtcvs.2013.09.033. Epub 2013 Nov 1.

Resource use trends in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in adults: an analysis of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample 1998-2009.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md. Electronic address: bmaxwell@jhu.edu.
2
Department of Anesthesia, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.
3
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, Calif.
4
Department of Anesthesia, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The study objective was to determine whether significant trends over time have occurred in resource use associated with the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in critically ill adults.

METHODS:

All adult admissions involving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were examined by using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database (years 1998-2009). Trends in volume, outcome, and resource use (including hospital charges, length of stay, and charges per day) were analyzed.

RESULTS:

An estimated total of 8753 admissions involved extracorporeal membrane oxygenation over the study period. Overall length of stay was 18.3 ± 1.3 days. Total hospital charges averaged $344,009 ± $30,707 per admission, with average charges per day of $40,588 ± $3099. Cumulative national charges for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation admissions increased significantly from $109.0 million in 1998 to $764.7 million in 2009 (P = .0016). Charges per patient and length of stay also increased significantly (P = .0032 and .0321, respectively). The increasing trend in the number of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation admissions during the study period was not statistically significant (P = .19). The post-cardiotomy group had more favorable outcomes and lower resource use. A shift was observed in the relative case-mix of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation admissions over the study period, with a relative decrease in the post-cardiotomy group and increases in the cardiogenic shock, respiratory failure, and lung transplant groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results suggest that dramatic increases in resource use associated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are not solely the result of increased volume, but in part are due to a shift toward extracorporeal membrane oxygenation use in patient groups (other than in the post-cardiotomy setting) with greater resource use and worse outcomes.

PMID:
24183903
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtcvs.2013.09.033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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