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J Neurol Sci. 2014 Jan 15;336(1-2):122-6. doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2013.10.021. Epub 2013 Oct 22.

Comparison of the clinical profile of Parkinson's disease between Spanish and Cameroonian cohorts.

Author information

1
Neurology Department of Hospital Universitario Burgos, Spain. Electronic address: esthercubo@gmail.com.
2
Neurology Department Douala Laquintinie Hospital, Cameroon.
3
Research Unit, Alzheimer Center Reina Sofia Foundation, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain; National Center of Epidemiology and CIBERNED, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain.
4
National Center of Epidemiology and CIBERNED, Carlos III Institute of Health, Madrid, Spain.
5
Neurology Department of Hospital Universitario Burgos, Spain.
6
Medical School Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain.
7
Psychiatry Department, Douala Laquintinie Hospital, Cameroon.
8
Neurology Department, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There are limited data in terms of the clinical profile of Parkinson's disease in sub-Saharan African patients.

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the clinical profile and access to standard antiparkinsonian therapies of a Cameroonian cohort of patients with an age, sex, and disease duration-matched Spanish cohort (Longitudinal Study of Parkinson's disease, ELEP).

METHODS:

Observational, cross-sectional design. Demographic data were collected and the following ELEP assessments were applied: Scales for Outcomes in Parkinson's disease (SCOPA) Motor, Autonomic, Cognition, Sleep and Psychosocial; Hoehn and Yahr staging; modified Parkinson Psychosis Rating Scale; Cumulative Illness Rating Scale-Geriatrics; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; pain and fatigue visual analog scales; Zarit, and EuroQoL.

RESULTS:

74 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease were included (37 from each country) with a mean age of 64.4±10.5 years old, 70.3% males, and mean disease duration of 5.6±5.9 years. Compared to the Spanish cohort, Cameroonians were intermittently treated, less frequently received dopaminergic agonists (p<0.001), had a trend for taking lower doses of levodopa (p=0.06), and were more frequently on anticholinergics (p<0.0005). Cameroonians were more severely impaired in terms of motor (Hoehn Yahr stage, p=0.03; SCOPA-Motor, p<0.001), cognitive status (p<0.001), anxiety and depression (p<0.001), psychosis (p=0.008), somnolence, fatigue and pain (p<0.001, respectively), caregiver burden (p<0.0001), and quality of life (p=0.002). Instead, autonomic, comorbidity, and nocturnal sleep problems were similarly found.

CONCLUSIONS:

Limited and intermittent access to dopaminergic drugs has a negative impact on motor symptoms, nonmotor symptoms and quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease and their caregivers.

KEYWORDS:

Africa; Cognition; Dopamine; Epidemiology; Motor; Neurodegenerative diseases; Nonmotor symptoms; Parkinson's disease

PMID:
24183853
DOI:
10.1016/j.jns.2013.10.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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