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Gynecol Oncol. 2014 Jan;132(1):154-8. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.10.024. Epub 2013 Oct 29.

A pilot randomized control trial to evaluate pelvic floor muscle training for urinary incontinence among gynecologic cancer survivors.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA. Electronic address: trutledge@salud.unm.edu.
2
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA.
3
School of Medicine, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA; Department of Statistics, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

We previously reported high rates of urinary incontinence among gynecologic cancer survivors and aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a simple intervention for treatment of urinary incontinence in this population.

METHODS:

We recruited 40 gynecologic cancer survivors who reported urinary incontinence on a validated questionnaire. Women were randomized to either pelvic floor muscle training/behavioral therapy (treatment group) or usual care (control group). The primary outcome measure, assessed at 12 weeks post intervention, was a 40% difference in the validated Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) score. Fisher's exact test was used to identify differences between groups for frequency data; two-sample t-test was conducted for continuous measurements.

RESULTS:

Mean age of this cohort was 57 (range: 37-79). The majority of the survivors had uterine cancer (60%), 18% had received radiation therapy, 95% had received surgical therapy, and 35% had received chemotherapy. At three months, 80% of the treatment and 40% of the control group reported that their urinary incontinence was "much better" or "very much better" as evaluated by the Patient Global Impression of Improvement scale (p=0.02). Brink's scores were significantly improved in the treatment group as compared to those of the controls (p<0.0001). Treatment group adherence was high; the treatment group performed exercises with an average of 22 days/month.

CONCLUSIONS:

Urinary incontinence negatively affects quality of life, and despite a high prevalence among gynecologic cancer survivors, it is often under-assessed and undertreated. We found a simple intervention that included pelvic floor muscle training and behavioral therapy, which significantly improved cancer survivor's urinary incontinence.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer survivorship; Quality of life; Urinary incontinence

PMID:
24183730
PMCID:
PMC5399541
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2013.10.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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