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Perit Dial Int. 2013 Nov-Dec;33(6):629-34. doi: 10.3747/pdi.2012.00255. Epub 2013 Oct 31.

Impact of hernias on peritoneal dialysis technique survival and residual renal function.

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1
Imperial Renal and Transplant Center, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We evaluated the effect of hernias and their surgical or conservative management on peritoneal dialysis (PD) technique survival and residual renal function.

METHODS:

This 10-year single-center retrospective case-control study (January 2001 - January 2011) compared patient survival, PD technique survival, and residual renal function in patients with a history of abdominal hernias and in a control cohort matched for age and PD vintage.

RESULTS:

Of 73 hernias identified in 63 patients (mean age: 55 years; 63% men), umbilical hernias were the most frequent (40%), followed by inguinal (33%), incisional, and epigastric hernias. Some hernias were surgically repaired before (n = 10) or at the time of PD catheter insertion (n = 11), but most (71%) were diagnosed and managed after initiation of PD. Overall, 49 of 73 (67%) hernias were treated surgically. In 53% of subjects, early postoperative dialysis was not needed; only 7 patients required temporary hemodialysis. The occurrence of a hernia and its treatment did not significantly affect residual renal function. After a hernia diagnosis or repair, 86% of patients were able to continue with PD. ♢

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence of abdominal hernia and hernia management in patients on PD do not significantly influence residual renal function or PD technique survival. Timely management of hernias is advisable and does not preclude continuation with PD as a dialysis modality.

KEYWORDS:

Hernia; residual renal function; survival

PMID:
24179105
PMCID:
PMC3862092
DOI:
10.3747/pdi.2012.00255
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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