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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Jan;99(1):330-7. doi: 10.1210/jc.2013-3241. Epub 2013 Dec 20.

Maternal antenatal vitamin D status and offspring muscle development: findings from the Southampton Women's Survey.

Author information

1
Medical Research Council Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit (N.C.H., R.J.M., A.A.S., G.N., S.M.R., K.M.G., H.M.I., C.C.), University of Southampton, Southampton SO16 6YD, United Kingdom; National Institute for Health Research Southampton Biomedical Research Centre (N.C.H., K.M.G., C.C.), University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton SO16 6YD, United Kingdom; Paediatric Endocrinology (R.J.M., J.H.D.), University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton SO16 6YD, United Kingdom; and National Institute for Health Research Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit (M.K.J., C.C.), University of Oxford, Nuffield Orthopedic Centre, Headington, Oxford OX3 7HE, United Kingdom.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status in pregnancy has been associated with offspring bone development and adiposity. Vitamin D has also been implicated in postnatal muscle function, but little is known about a role for antenatal 25(OH)D exposure in programming muscle development.

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated the associations between maternal plasma 25(OH)D status at 34 weeks of gestation and offspring lean mass and muscle strength at 4 years of age.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

We studied a prospective UK population-based mother-offspring cohort: the Southampton Women's Survey (SWS).

PARTICIPANTS:

Initially, 12,583 nonpregnant women were recruited into the SWS, of whom 3159 had singleton pregnancies; 678 mother-child pairs were included in this analysis.

MAIN OUTCOMES MEASURED:

At 4 years of age, offspring assessments included hand grip strength and whole-body dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, yielding lean mass and percent lean mass. Physical activity was assessed by 7-day accelerometry in a subset of children (n=326).

RESULTS:

The maternal serum 25(OH)D concentration in pregnancy was positively associated with offspring height-adjusted hand grip strength (β=0.10 SD/SD, P=.013), which persisted after adjustment for maternal confounding factors, duration of breastfeeding, and child's physical activity at 4 years (β=0.13 SD/SD, P=.014). Maternal 25(OH)D was also positively associated with offspring percent lean mass (β=0.11 SD/SD, P=.006), but not total lean mass (β=0.06 SD/SD, P=.15). However, this association did not persist after adjustment for confounding factors (β=0.09 SD/SD, P=.11).

CONCLUSIONS:

This observational study suggests that intrauterine exposure to 25(OH)D during late pregnancy might influence offspring muscle development through an effect primarily on muscle strength rather than on muscle mass.

PMID:
24178796
PMCID:
PMC3880861
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2013-3241
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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