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Patient Educ Couns. 2014 Feb;94(2):250-4. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2013.09.026. Epub 2013 Oct 14.

Association between reported screening and counseling about energy drinks and energy drink intake among U.S. adolescents.

Author information

1
Epidemic Intelligence Service, Office of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and Laboratory Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: wiz3@cdc.gov.
2
Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Possible adverse health consequences of excessive energy drink (ED) consumption have led to recommendations by the American Academy of Pediatrics discouraging ED intake by youth. However, limited information on ED counseling by health care providers exists.

METHODS:

Data was obtained from the 2011 YouthStyles Survey administered to youth aged 12-17 (n=815). The outcome variable was ED consumption (none vs. ≥1 time/week) and exposure variables were screening and counseling about ED (if doctor/nurse asked about ED consumption and if doctor/nurse recommended against ED consumption).

RESULTS:

Approximately 8.5% of youth consumed energy drinks weekly, 11.5% reported being asked by their doctor/nurse about frequency of ED consumption, and 11.1% were advised by their doctor/nurse against ED intake. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds for drinking ED ≥1 time/week was significantly higher in youth who were asked how often they drank ED by their doctor/nurse (odds ratio=2.46) vs. those who were not asked.

CONCLUSION:

About 1 in 9 youth reported receiving counseling discouraging ED consumption from their doctor/nurse, and a greater proportion of youth who were screened about ED also reported ED consumption.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Efforts by health care providers to educate youth about potential harms of consuming ED are needed.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescent; Counseling; Energy drinks; Health care providers; Sugar-sweetened beverage; Youth

PMID:
24176609
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2013.09.026
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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