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Mediators Inflamm. 2013;2013:935608. doi: 10.1155/2013/935608. Epub 2013 Sep 23.

Increased anti-phospholipid antibodies in autism spectrum disorders.

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1
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, Davis, USA ; MIND Institute, University of California, 2805 50th Street Sacramento, Davis, CA 95817, USA.

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are characterized by impairments in communication, social interactions, and repetitive behaviors. While the etiology of ASD is complex and likely involves the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, growing evidence suggests that immune dysfunction and the presence of autoimmune responses including autoantibodies may play a role in ASD. Anti-phospholipid antibodies are believed to occur from both genetic and environmental factors and have been linked to a number of neuropsychiatric symptoms such as cognitive impairments, anxiety, and repetitive behaviors. In the current study, we investigated whether there were elevated levels of anti-phospholipid antibodies in a cross-sectional analysis of plasma of young children with ASD compared to age-matched typically developing (TD) controls and children with developmental delays (DD) other than ASD. We found that levels of anti-cardiolipin, β 2-glycoprotein 1, and anti-phosphoserine antibodies were elevated in children with ASD compared with age-matched TD and DD controls. Further, the increase in antibody levels was associated with more impaired behaviors reported by parents. This study provides the first evidence for elevated production of anti-phospholipid antibodies in young children with ASD and provides a unique avenue for future research into determining possible pathogenic mechanisms that may underlie some cases of ASD.

PMID:
24174712
PMCID:
PMC3794552
DOI:
10.1155/2013/935608
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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