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Theor Appl Genet. 1995 Jul;91(2):382-8. doi: 10.1007/BF00220903.

Characterization of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in cultivated rice contributing to field resistance to sheath blight (Rhizoctonia solani).

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1
Texas A&M University Agricultural and Extension Center, Route 7, Box 999, 77713, Beaumont, TX, USA.

Abstract

Sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, is one of the most important diseases of rice. Despite extensive searches of the rice germ plasm, the major gene(s) which give complete resistance to the fungus have not been identified. However, there is much variation in quantitatively inherited resistance to R. solani, and this type of resistance can offer adequate protection against the pathogen under field conditions. Using 255 F4 bulked populations from a cross between the susceptible variety 'Lemont' and the resistant variety 'Teqing', 2 years of field disease evaluation and 113 well-distributed RFLP markers, we identified six quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to resistance to R. solani. These QTLs are located on 6 of the 12 rice chromosomes and collectively explain approximately 60% of the genotypic variation or 47% of the phenotypic variation in the 'Lemont'x'Teqing' cross. One of these resistance QTLs (QSbr4a), which accounted for 6% of the genotypic variation in resistance to R. solani, appeared to be independent of associated morphological traits. The remaining five putative resistance loci (QSbr2a, QSbr3a, QSbr8a, QSbr9a and QSbr12a) all mapped to chromosomal regions also associated with increased plant height, three of which were also associated with QTLs causing later heading. This was consistent with the observation that heading date and plant height accounted for 47% of the genotypic variation in resistance to R. solani in this population. There were also weak associations between resistance to R. solani and leaf width, which were likely due to linkage with a QTL for this trait rather than to a physiological relationship.

PMID:
24169789
DOI:
10.1007/BF00220903

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