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Am J Ind Med. 2014 Feb;57(2):163-71. doi: 10.1002/ajim.22272. Epub 2013 Oct 25.

Parkinson's disease and occupation: differences in associations by case identification method suggest referral bias.

Author information

1
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Abstract

METHODS:

We used a population-based sample of 403 Parkinson's disease cases and 405 controls to examine risks by occupation. Results were compared to a previous clinic-based analysis.

RESULTS:

With censoring of jobs held within 10 years of diagnosis, the following had significantly or strongly increased risks: social science, law and library jobs (OR = 1.8); farming and horticulture jobs (OR = 2.0); gas station jobs (OR = 2.6); and welders (OR = 3.0). The following had significantly decreased risks: management and administration jobs (OR = 0.70); and other health care jobs (OR = 0.44).

CONCLUSIONS:

These results were consistent with other findings for social science and farming occupations. Risks for teaching, medicine and health occupations were not elevated, unlike our previous clinic-based study. This underscores the value of population-based over clinic-based samples. Occupational studies may be particularly susceptible to referral bias because social networks may spread preferentially via jobs.

KEYWORDS:

Parkinson's disease; occupational exposure; selection bias

PMID:
24166740
DOI:
10.1002/ajim.22272
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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