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Nanomedicine. 2014 Apr;10(3):589-97. doi: 10.1016/j.nano.2013.10.003. Epub 2013 Oct 23.

Biocompatibility of functionalized boron phosphate (BPO4) nanoparticles for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) application.

Author information

1
Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Laboratories of Biochemistry, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.
2
Department of Chemistry, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.
3
Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.
4
Department of Clinico-Surgical Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; I.R.C.C.S. S.Matteo Hospital, Pavia, Italy.
5
Department of Chemistry, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy; fI.E.N.I. C.N.R. Unit of Lecco, C.So Promessi Sposi n°29, 23900 Lecco, Italy.
6
Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Laboratories of Biochemistry, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. Electronic address: minetti@unipv.it.

Abstract

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapy treatment based on the accumulation in the tumor of a (10)B-containing drug and subsequent irradiation with low energy neutrons, which bring about the decay of (10)B to (7)Li and an α particle, causing the death of the neoplastic cell. The effectiveness of BNCT is limited by the low delivery and accumulation of the used boron-containing compounds. Here we report the development and the characterization of BPO4 nanoparticles (NPs) as a novel possible alternative drug for BNCT. An extensive analysis of BPO4 NP biocompatibility was performed using both mature blood cells (erythrocytes, neutrophils and platelets) and a model of hematopoietic progenitor cells. A time- and concentration-dependent cytotoxicity study was performed on neoplastic coloncarcinoma and osteosarcoma cell lines. BPO4 functionalization with folic acid, introduced to improve the uptake by tumor cells, appeared to effectively limit the unwanted effects of NPs on the analyzed blood components.

FROM THE CLINICAL EDITOR:

Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a radiotherapy treatment modality based on the accumulation of a (10)B-containing drug and subsequent irradiation with low energy neutrons, inducing the decay of (10)B to (7)Li and an α particle, causing neoplastic cell death. This team of authors reports on a folic acid functionalized BPO4 nanoparticle with improved characteristics compared with conventional BNCT approaches, as demonstrated in tumor cell lines, and hopefully to be followed by translational human studies.

KEYWORDS:

Blood cells; Boron-carrier; Cancer; Erythrocytes; Folic acid; Hemolysis; Nanomaterials; Neutrophils; Platelet aggregation

PMID:
24161383
DOI:
10.1016/j.nano.2013.10.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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