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Genes Nutr. 2013 Nov;8(6):561-9. doi: 10.1007/s12263-013-0356-4. Epub 2013 Sep 25.

Vitamin D receptor BsmI polymorphism modulates soy intake and 25-hydroxyvitamin D supplementation benefits in cardiovascular disease risk factors profile.

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1
Department of Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lleida-IRBLleida, Av. Rovira Roure 80, 25198, Lleida, Spain, jceserrano@mex.udl.cat.

Abstract

Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms may predispose that not all individuals could have benefits from the nutritional supplementation of 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Furthermore, vitamin D-related cardiovascular effects may also be influenced by soy isoflavones considered endocrine regulators of cardiovascular homeostasis. To find possible gene-diet interactions by evaluating individualized lipid metabolism benefits from an increase in soy and 25-hydroxyvitamin D intake, 106 healthy individuals, genotyped for vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene polymorphism rs1544410 (BsmI) were randomly assigned to either no intake, to daily 250 mL or 500 mL of a 25-hydroxyvitamin D supplemented SB for 2 months. The soybean beverage induced differences in cardiovascular risk factors (lipid profile, blood pressure, TNFα and MCP-1), as well as vitamin D metabolites in a dose-gene-dependent relation. Thus, VDR BsmI polymorphism affected individual response being the GG genotype the ones that showed dose-dependent manner responsiveness in the reduction in total cholesterol, LDL and triglycerides in comparison with the AA/AG genotype. These differences were associated with increased plasma levels of 1α,25-dyhydroxyvitamin D3 in the carriers of the GG genotype. It was concluded that metabolic response to 25-hydroxyvitamin D and soybean supplementation is dependent on VDR BsmI GG genotype due to a higher conversion rate from vitamin D precursors.

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