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Adv Drug Deliv Rev. 2014 May;71:58-76. doi: 10.1016/j.addr.2013.10.001. Epub 2013 Oct 22.

Drug delivery strategies in the therapy of inflammatory bowel disease.

Author information

1
Clinic of Internal Medicine IV, University Hospital Jena, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena, Germany. Electronic address: Christian.Lautenschlaeger@med.uni-jena.de.
2
Clinic of Internal Medicine IV, University Hospital Jena, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena, Germany. Electronic address: Carsten.Schmidt@med.uni-jena.de.
3
Institute of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Friedrich-Schiller University Jena, Otto-Schott-Strasse 41, 07745 Jena, Germany. Electronic address: Dagmar.Fischer@uni-jena.de.
4
Clinic of Internal Medicine IV, University Hospital Jena, Erlanger Allee 101, 07740 Jena, Germany. Electronic address: Andreas.Stallmach@med.uni-jena.de.

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a frequently occurring disease in young people, which is characterized by a chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The therapy of IBD is dominated by the administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs, which suppress the intestinal inflammatory burden and improve the disease-related symptoms. Established treatment strategies are characterized by a limited therapeutical efficacy and the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. Thus, the development of novel disease-targeted drug delivery strategies is intended for a more effective therapy and demonstrates the potential to address unmet medical needs. This review gives an overview about the established as well as future-oriented drug targeting strategies, including intestine targeting by conventional drug delivery systems (DDS), disease targeted drug delivery by synthetic DDS and disease targeted drug delivery by biological DDS. Furthermore, this review analyses the targeting mechanisms of the respective DDS and discusses the possible field of utilization in IBD.

KEYWORDS:

Biological drug delivery systems; Colitis ulcerosa; Crohn's disease; Drug targeting; Inflammatory bowel disease; Particular drug delivery systems; Targeted drug delivery

PMID:
24157534
DOI:
10.1016/j.addr.2013.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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