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Appl Ergon. 2014 May;45(3):799-806. doi: 10.1016/j.apergo.2013.10.001. Epub 2013 Oct 21.

The impact of sit-stand office workstations on worker discomfort and productivity: a review.

Author information

1
Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
2
Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: jack.callaghan@uwaterloo.ca.

Abstract

This review examines the effectiveness of sit-stand workstations at reducing worker discomfort without causing a decrease in productivity. Four databases were searched for studies on sit-stand workstations, and five selection criteria were used to identify appropriate articles. Fourteen articles were identified that met at least three of the five selection criteria. Seven of the identified studies reported either local, whole body or both local and whole body subjective discomfort scores. Six of these studies indicated implementing sit-stand workstations in an office environment led to lower levels of reported subjective discomfort (three of which were statistically significant). Therefore, this review concluded that sit-stand workstations are likely effective in reducing perceived discomfort. Eight of the identified studies reported a productivity outcome. Three of these studies reported an increase in productivity during sit-stand work, four reported no affect on productivity, and one reported mixed productivity results. Therefore, this review concluded that sit-stand workstations do not cause a decrease in productivity.

KEYWORDS:

Discomfort; Productivity; Sit–stand

PMID:
24157240
DOI:
10.1016/j.apergo.2013.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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