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Nutrients. 2013 Oct 21;5(10):4174-83. doi: 10.3390/nu5104174.

Maize prolamins could induce a gluten-like cellular immune response in some celiac disease patients.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition, Research Center for Food and Development (CIAD, A.C.), Carr. La Victoria, Km. 0.6, Hermosillo, Sonora 83304, Mexico. amc@ciad.mx.

Abstract

Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune-mediated enteropathy triggered by dietary gluten in genetically prone individuals. The current treatment for CD is a strict lifelong gluten-free diet. However, in some CD patients following a strict gluten-free diet, the symptoms do not remit. These cases may be refractory CD or due to gluten contamination; however, the lack of response could be related to other dietary ingredients, such as maize, which is one of the most common alternatives to wheat used in the gluten-free diet. In some CD patients, as a rare event, peptides from maize prolamins could induce a celiac-like immune response by similar or alternative pathogenic mechanisms to those used by wheat gluten peptides. This is supported by several shared features between wheat and maize prolamins and by some experimental results. Given that gluten peptides induce an immune response of the intestinal mucosa both in vivo and in vitro, peptides from maize prolamins could also be tested to determine whether they also induce a cellular immune response. Hypothetically, maize prolamins could be harmful for a very limited subgroup of CD patients, especially those that are non-responsive, and if it is confirmed, they should follow, in addition to a gluten-free, a maize-free diet.

PMID:
24152750
PMCID:
PMC3820067
DOI:
10.3390/nu5104174
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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