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Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2013 Nov;67(7):532-9. doi: 10.1111/pcn.12104. Epub 2013 Oct 24.

Association of metabolic syndrome with atypical features of depression in Japanese people.

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1
Department of Hygiene and Public Health, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Division of Psychosomatic Medicine, Teikyo University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

AIM:

It has been controversial whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with depression. We aimed to clarify the correlation between MetS and depression, considering atypical features of depression.

METHODS:

Participants were 1011 Japanese men aged 20-59 years. MetS was diagnosed according to criteria set by the International Diabetes Federation. Clinical interviews for major depressive disorder (MDD) employed the DSM-IV; MDD was classified into atypical and non-atypical types. The prevalence of MetS was compared between the groups with no MDD, atypical depression, and non-atypical depression via trend analyses. Multiple logistic regression analyses examined the association of MetS with atypical depression and the features thereof.

RESULTS:

In total, 141 (14.0%) participants were diagnosed with MetS and 57 (5.6%) were diagnosed with MDD (14 had atypical and 43 had non-atypicalMDD). The prevalence of MetS was the highest in the group with atypical depression, followed by the non-atypical depression and no MDD groups, respectively, with a marginally significant trend (P = 0.07). The adjusted odds ratios of MetS associated with depression were 3.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-13.2) for atypical depression and 1.6 (95% CI 0.7-3.6) for non-atypical depression. Among the five features of atypical depression, only hyperphagia was significantly related to MetS (odds ratio 2.7, 95% CI 1.8-4.1).

CONCLUSION:

There was a positive association between MetS and atypical depression, but not between MetS and non-atypical depression. Specifically, hyperphagia seems to be an important factor affecting the correlation between MetS and atypical depression.

KEYWORDS:

Japan; atypical depression; hyperphagia; major depression; metabolic syndrome

PMID:
24152284
DOI:
10.1111/pcn.12104
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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