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Clin Nutr. 2014 Jun;33(3):415-20. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2013.10.001. Epub 2013 Oct 10.

Association between zinc intake and risk of digestive tract cancers: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, Hangzhou 310058, China.
2
State Key Laboratory for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou 310003, China.
3
Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003, China; Department of Biomedicine, Zhejiang Agriculture and Forestry University School of Biotechnology, 88 Huan Cheng Bei Road, Lin An, Zhejiang 311300, China. Electronic address: gastate@zju.edu.cn.
4
Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, Hangzhou 310058, China. Electronic address: georgewuer@126.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Association between zinc intake and digestive tract cancers risk has been reported in several epidemiological studies, while the results were controversial. The aim of our study was to get a systemic review of this issue.

METHODS:

PUBMED and EMBASE were searched up to April 2013, supplemented with manual-screening for relevant articles. Two independent reviewers independently extracted data from eligible studies, risk ratio (RR) or odds ratio (OR) with 95% CIs for the highest versus lowest categories of zinc intake was adopted. Either a fixed- or a random-effects model was adopted to estimate overall odds ratios. Besides, dose-response, subgroup, and publication bias analyses were applied.

RESULTS:

Nineteen studies with approximately 400,000 participants were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled relative risk (RR) of overall digestive tract cancers for the highest versus lowest categories of zinc intake was 0.82 (95% CI: 0.70-0.96; p = 0.013). Comparing the highest with lowest categories, higher zinc intake was significantly associated with reduced colorectal cancer risk (pooled RR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.70-0.92; p = 0.002), while zinc intake was not statistically associated with gastric cancer risk (pooled RR = 0.91, 95% CI: 0.64-1.29; p = 0.581) or esophageal cancer risk (pooled RR = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.44-1.17; p = 0.187). However, subgroup analyses showed that zinc intake was significantly associated with esophageal cancer risk and gastric cancer risk in Asia, but not in America and Europe.

CONCLUSIONS:

Dietary zinc intake was inversely associated with digestive tract cancers, especially colorectal cancer risk in this study.

KEYWORDS:

Digestive tract cancers; Meta-analysis; Zinc

PMID:
24148607
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2013.10.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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