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Cornea. 2013 Dec;32(12):1562-6. doi: 10.1097/ICO.0b013e3182a407c3.

Incidence and prevalence of episcleritis and scleritis in Northern California.

Author information

1
*Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY; †Francis I. Proctor Foundation for Research in Ophthalmology and the Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, CA; ‡Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA; §Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY; and ¶The Permanente Medical Group, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Oakland and Richmond, CA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To evaluate the incidence and prevalence of episcleritis and scleritis in a large well-defined population in Northern California.

METHODS:

Secondary analysis was performed on data from the Northern California Epidemiology of Uveitis Study. The patient database of a large regional health maintenance organization was searched for all patients who potentially experienced ocular inflammatory disease during the 12-month study period. Medical records were reviewed for all potential patients to confirm ocular inflammatory disease and specific diagnosis, establish the time of onset, and collect additional data. Age- and sex-stratified quarterly study population data were used to calculate incidence rates and prevalence ratios.

RESULTS:

After reviewing 2011 possible cases, 297 new-onset cases of episcleritis, 39 prior-onset cases of episcleritis, 25 new-onset cases of scleritis, and 8 prior-onset cases of scleritis were confirmed. For episcleritis, the overall incidence was 41.0 per 100,000 person-years and an annual prevalence ratio of 52.6 per 100,000. The overall incidence of scleritis was 3.4 per 100,000 person-years and an annual prevalence ratio of 5.2 per 100,000 persons. For both episcleritis and scleritis, there was a statistically significant increase in eye disease in older patients (P = 0.05 and <0.001, respectively) and for women in comparison with men (P = 0.001 and <0.001, respectively). Patients with scleritis were older than those with episcleritis (P = 0.017).

CONCLUSIONS:

This study found that patients with scleritis were older than those with episcleritis and that women had higher rates of both episcleritis and scleritis compared with what men had.

PMID:
24145628
DOI:
10.1097/ICO.0b013e3182a407c3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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