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Microvasc Res. 2013 Nov;90:173-9. doi: 10.1016/j.mvr.2013.10.002. Epub 2013 Oct 18.

Increased adhesive and inflammatory properties in blood outgrowth endothelial cells from sickle cell anemia patients.

Author information

1
INCT de Sangue, Hematology and Hemotherapy Centre, School of Medicine, University of Campinas - UNICAMP, Brazil.

Abstract

The endothelium plays an important role in sickle cell anemia (SCA) pathophysiology, interacting with red cells, leukocytes and platelets during the vaso-occlusive process and undergoing activation and dysfunction as a result of intravascular hemolysis and chronic inflammation. Blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOECs) can be isolated from adult peripheral blood and have been used in diverse studies, since they have a high proliferative capacity and a stable phenotype during in vitro culture. This study aimed to establish BOEC cultures for use as an in vitro study model for endothelial function in sickle cell anemia. Once established, BOECs from steady-state SCA individuals (SCA BOECs) were characterized for their adhesive and inflammatory properties, in comparison to BOECs from healthy control individuals (CON BOECs). Cell adhesion assays demonstrated that control individual red cells adhered significantly more to SCA BOEC than to CON BOEC. Despite these increased adhesive properties, SCA BOECs did not demonstrate significant differences in their expression of major endothelial adhesion molecules, compared to CON BOECs. SCA BOECs were also found to be pro-inflammatory, producing a significantly higher quantity of the cytokine, IL-8, than CON BOECs. From the results obtained, we suggest that BOEC may be a good model for the in vitro study of SCA. Data indicate that endothelial cells of sickle cell anemia patients may have abnormal inflammatory and adhesive properties even outside of the chronic inflammatory and vaso-occlusive environment of patients.

PMID:
24144783
DOI:
10.1016/j.mvr.2013.10.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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