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Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao. 2013 Oct;33(10):1525-8.

[Comparative study of glucocorticoids versus NSAIDS for treatment of partial splenic embolization syndrome].

[Article in Chinese]

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282, China. E-mail: yuchanghui@yeah.net.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To compare the clinical effect of glucocorticoids and NSAID in the treatment of partial splenic embolization syndrome.

METHODS:

Sixty patients with cirrhosis and spleen hyperactivity who developed partial splenic embolization syndrome after partial splenic embolization with Seldinger technique were randomized equally into two groups to receive treatments with intravenous dexamethasone or oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). White blood cell counts, liver functions, fever duration, abdominal pain duration, hospital stay, and occurrence of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and spleen abscess were recorded and analyzed.

RESULTS:

In dexamethasone group, the average fever duration, abdominal pain duration, and hospitalization days was 3.36∓2.31, 7.39∓4.00, and 11.48∓3.29 days, respectively, significantly shorter than those in NSAIDs group (5.72∓3.83, 9.59∓4.22, and 15.07∓7.93 days, respectively, P<0.05). Seven days after the operation, white blood cell count (×10(9)=L) significantly increased from 4.23∓5.09 to 8.49∓3.53 in dexamethasone group (P<0.05), and from 3.21∓1.33 to 6.52∓2.37 in NSAIDs group (P<0.05); the increment was more obvious in dexamethasone group (P<0.05). The two groups of patients showed no significant difference in liver functions after the operation. None of the patients developed upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage or spleen abscess.

CONCLUSION:

Intravenous dexamethasone produces better therapeutic effect than oral NSAIDs in the management of partial splenic embolization syndrome.

PMID:
24144761
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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