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Brain. 2013 Dec;136(Pt 12):3766-74. doi: 10.1093/brain/awt280. Epub 2013 Oct 18.

Beneficial effects of bumetanide in a CaV1.1-R528H mouse model of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis.

Author information

1
1 Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, UT Southwestern Medical Centre, Dallas, Texas, USA.

Abstract

Transient attacks of weakness in hypokalaemic periodic paralysis are caused by reduced fibre excitability from paradoxical depolarization of the resting potential in low potassium. Mutations of calcium channel and sodium channel genes have been identified as the underlying molecular defects that cause instability of the resting potential. Despite these scientific advances, therapeutic options remain limited. In a mouse model of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis from a sodium channel mutation (NaV1.4-R669H), we recently showed that inhibition of chloride influx with bumetanide reduced the susceptibility to attacks of weakness, in vitro. The R528H mutation in the calcium channel gene (CACNA1S encoding CaV1.1) is the most common cause of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis. We developed a CaV1.1-R528H knock-in mouse model of hypokalaemic periodic paralysis and show herein that bumetanide protects against both muscle weakness from low K+ challenge in vitro and loss of muscle excitability in vivo from a glucose plus insulin infusion. This work demonstrates the critical role of the chloride gradient in modulating the susceptibility to ictal weakness and establishes bumetanide as a potential therapy for hypokalaemic periodic paralysis arising from either NaV1.4 or CaV1.1 mutations.

KEYWORDS:

NKCC transporter; acetazolamide; calcium channel; skeletal muscle

PMID:
24142145
PMCID:
PMC3859222
DOI:
10.1093/brain/awt280
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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