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Biosens Bioelectron. 2014 Mar 15;53:167-74. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2013.08.057. Epub 2013 Sep 27.

Enhanced nucleic acid amplification with blood in situ by wire-guided droplet manipulation (WDM).

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1
Biomedical Engineering Graduate Interdisciplinary Program and Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0038, USA.

Abstract

There are many challenges facing the use of molecular biology to provide pertinent information in a timely, cost effective manner. Wire-guided droplet manipulation (WDM) is an emerging format for conducting molecular biology with unique characteristics to address these challenges. To demonstrate the use of WDM, an apparatus was designed and assembled to automate polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a reprogrammable platform. WDM minimizes thermal resistance by convective heat transfer to a constantly moving droplet in direct contact with heated silicone oil. PCR amplification of the GAPDH gene was demonstrated at a speed of 8.67 s/cycle. Conventional PCR was shown to be inhibited by the presence of blood. WDM PCR utilizes molecular partitioning of nucleic acids and other PCR reagents from blood components, within the water-in-oil droplet, to increase PCR reaction efficiency with blood in situ. The ability to amplify nucleic acids in the presence of blood simplifies pre-treatment protocols towards true point-of-care diagnostic use. The 16s rRNA hypervariable regions V3 and V6 were amplified from Klebsiella pneumoniae genomic DNA with blood in situ. The detection limit of WDM PCR was 1 ng/μL or 10(5)genomes/μL with blood in situ. The application of WDM for rapid, automated detection of bacterial DNA from whole blood may have an enormous impact on the clinical diagnosis of infections in bloodstream or chronic wound/ulcer, and patient safety and morbidity.

KEYWORDS:

16s rRNA; Blood infection; Molecular partitioning; PCR

PMID:
24140832
PMCID:
PMC3868462
DOI:
10.1016/j.bios.2013.08.057
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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