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Heart Rhythm. 2014 Feb;11(2):289-98. doi: 10.1016/j.hrthm.2013.10.032. Epub 2013 Oct 16.

Device artifact reduction for magnetic resonance imaging of patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and ventricular tachycardia: late gadolinium enhancement correlation with electroanatomic mapping.

Author information

1
UCLA Cardiac Arrhythmia Center, UCLA Health System, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California.
2
Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California.
3
UCLA Cardiac Arrhythmia Center, UCLA Health System, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California; Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California.
4
UCLA Cardiac Arrhythmia Center, UCLA Health System, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California; Department of Radiological Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California. Electronic address: penghu@mednet.ucla.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of ventricular scar has been shown to be accurate for detection and characterization of arrhythmia substrates. However, the majority of patients referred for ventricular tachycardia (VT) ablation have an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD), which obscures image integrity and the clinical utility of MRI.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a wideband LGE MRI technique for device artifact removal.

METHODS:

A novel wideband LGE MRI technique was developed to allow for improved scar evaluation on patients with ICDs. The wideband technique and the standard LGE MRI were tested on 18 patients with ICDs. VT ablation was performed in 13 of 18 patients with either endocardial and/or epicardial approach and the correlation between the scar identified on MRI and electroanatomic mapping (EAM) was analyzed.

RESULTS:

Hyperintensity artifact was present in 16 of 18 of patients using standard MRI, which was eliminated using the wideband LGE and allowed for MRI interpretation in 15 of 16 patients. All patients had ICD lead characteristics confirmed as unchanged post-MRI and had no adverse events. LGE scar was seen in 11 of 18 patients. Among the 15 patients in whom wideband LGE allowed visualization of myocardium, 10 had LGE scar and 5 had normal myocardium in the regions with image artifacts when using the standard LGE. The left ventricular scar size measurements using wideband MRI and EAM were correlated with R(2) = 0.83 and P = .00003.

CONCLUSION:

Wideband LGE MRI improves the ability to visualize myocardium for clinical interpretation, which correlated well with EAM findings during VT ablation.

KEYWORDS:

Ablation; Arrhythmia; Catheter ablation; Clinical electrophysiology; Delayed enhancement; EAM; Electroanatomic mapping; ICD; Image artifact; Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator; LGE; LV; Late gadolinium enhancement; MRI; Magnetic resonance imaging; Myocardial scar; VT; Ventricular tachycardia; electroanatomic mapping; implantable cardioverter-defibrillator; late gadolinium enhancement; left ventricle; magnetic resonance imaging; ventricular tachycardia

PMID:
24140812
PMCID:
PMC3946910
DOI:
10.1016/j.hrthm.2013.10.032
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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