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Reprod Toxicol. 2014 Jan;43:45-55. doi: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2013.10.004. Epub 2013 Oct 16.

Genomic and proteomic analyses of 1,3-dinitrobenzene-induced testicular toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats.

Author information

1
Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701, Republic of Korea; Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon 305-343, Republic of Korea.
2
Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon 305-343, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon 305-701, Republic of Korea.
4
Korea Institute of Toxicology, Daejeon 305-343, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: sjyoon@kitox.re.kr.

Abstract

1,3-Dinitrobenzene (DNB) is an industrial intermediate and testicular toxicant that has been shown to target Sertoli cells. The mechanism of action of DNB in the testis, however, is unclear. To investigate global alterations in gene or protein expression during testicular toxicity, testes from rats treated orally with DNB were subjected to microarray and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analyses. Histopathological abnormalities were detected in the testes of the DNB-treated rats. Microarray analysis revealed that, during early testicular toxicity, several genes involved in apoptosis, germ cell/Sertoli cell junction, and tight junction signaling pathways were differentially expressed. Based on 2-DE analysis, 36 protein spots showing significantly different expression during early testicular toxicity were selected and identified. Network analysis of the identified proteins revealed that these proteins are associated with cellular development or reproductive system diseases. Collectively, these data will help clarify the molecular mechanism underlying testicular toxicity in DNB-exposed rats.

KEYWORDS:

1,3-Dinitrobenzene; Gene expression profiling; Genomics; Proteomics; Testicular toxicity

PMID:
24140754
DOI:
10.1016/j.reprotox.2013.10.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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