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Thromb Res. 2013;132(6):692-5. doi: 10.1016/j.thromres.2013.09.035. Epub 2013 Sep 29.

Immature platelet fraction in diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome.

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1
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Dysregulated platelet-endothelial interaction plays a pivotal role in atherothrombotic events in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Immature platelet fraction (IPF) is a hematologic parameter of automated hematologic analyzer and is related to platelet size and cytoplasmic RNA contents. It reflects thrombopoiesis and also is often used as the marker of platelet activity.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

We compared peripheral blood IPF, IPF count (IPC), and mean platelet volume (MPV) of DM and metabolic syndrome (MetS) patients with those of healthy controls. The IPF, IPC, MPV, and other blood cell indices were measured.

RESULTS:

The DM group had significantly higher IPF (2.20 vs. 1.70%, P=.020), IPC (4.80 vs. 4.60×10(9)/L, P=.043), and MPV (10.35 vs. 10.00fL, P=.012) than the control group. Those markers were also increased in MetS patients, but the differences were not statistically significant. Interestingly, when DM patients were stratified according to glycemic control status (≤6.5% HbA1c vs. 6.6-7.9% HbA1c vs. ≥8% HbA1c), both IPF and IPC were significantly increased in poor glycemic control group (P=.014 and .003). Including various diabetic complications in the analysis, IPF was higher in DM patients complicated by cardiovascular disease than the DM group without cardiovascular disease.

CONCLUSION:

IPF is elevated in patients with diabetes and associated with poor glycemic control and cardiovascular complication.

KEYWORDS:

Diabetes mellitus; Immature platelet fraction; Mean platelet volume; Metabolic syndrome

PMID:
24140451
DOI:
10.1016/j.thromres.2013.09.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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