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Am J Pathol. 2014 Feb;184(2):322-31. doi: 10.1016/j.ajpath.2013.06.035. Epub 2013 Oct 17.

Polyploidization in liver tissue.

Author information

1
French Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), U1016, Cochin Institute, Department of Development, Reproduction and Cancer, Paris, France; French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), UMR 8104, Paris, France; Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France.
2
French Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM), U1016, Cochin Institute, Department of Development, Reproduction and Cancer, Paris, France; French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS), UMR 8104, Paris, France; Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. Electronic address: chantal.desdouets@inserm.fr.

Abstract

Polyploidy (alias whole genome amplification) refers to organisms containing more than two basic sets of chromosomes. Polyploidy was first observed in plants more than a century ago, and it is known that such processes occur in many eukaryotes under a variety of circumstances. In mammals, the development of polyploid cells can contribute to tissue differentiation and, therefore, possibly a gain of function; alternately, it can be associated with development of disease, such as cancer. Polyploidy can occur because of cell fusion or abnormal cell division (endoreplication, mitotic slippage, or cytokinesis failure). Polyploidy is a common characteristic of the mammalian liver. Polyploidization occurs mainly during liver development, but also in adults with increasing age or because of cellular stress (eg, surgical resection, toxic exposure, or viral infections). This review will explore the mechanisms that lead to the development of polyploid cells, our current state of understanding of how polyploidization is regulated during liver growth, and its consequence on liver function.

PMID:
24140012
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajpath.2013.06.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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