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J Cutan Med Surg. 2013 Nov-Dec;17(6):392-7.

Higher frequency of psychiatric morbidity in patients with bacterial infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissue versus cutaneous neoplasms: results from a nationally representative sample from the United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Poor hygiene and nutrition and resultant compromised immune status in some psychiatric patients can increase susceptibility to bacterial skin infections.

OBJECTIVE:

We examined the frequency of ICD9-CM psychiatric disorders (codes 290-319) in bacterial skin infections (ICD9-CM codes 680-686) (N  =  18,734) versus malignant and benign cutaneous neoplasms (ICD9-CM codes 172, 173, 232, 216) (N  =  8,376), conditions that would be expected to cause psychological distress for the patient.

METHODS:

Logistic regression analysis was conducted controlling for age, sex, race, diabetes, obesity, and the use of antineoplastic and immunosuppressant medications.

RESULTS:

Skin infections were more commonly (odds ratio  =  3.03, 95% CI 1.58-5.82) associated with a psychiatric disorder; the most frequent diagnoses were substance dependence and abuse (19.5%), depressive disorder (19.0%), attention-deficit disorder (14.4%), and anxiety disorders (11.6%).

CONCLUSION:

In contrast to cutaneous neoplasms, bacterial skin infections were three times as likely to be associated with a psychiatric disorder. Psychiatric comorbidity should be ruled out as a factor in patients with intractable skin infections.

PMID:
24138975
DOI:
10.2310/7750.2013.13022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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