Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Surv Ophthalmol. 2014 Jan-Feb;59(1):30-46. doi: 10.1016/j.survophthal.2013.03.007. Epub 2013 Oct 15.

Current management of Coats disease.

Author information

1
Division of Vitreoretinal Surgery, Charles Retina Institute, Memphis, Tennessee; Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Eye Institute, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee. Electronic address: ejsigler@gmail.com.
2
Division of Vitreoretinal Surgery, Charles Retina Institute, Memphis, Tennessee; Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Eye Institute, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee.
3
Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Eye Institute, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee; Ocular Oncology Division, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee.

Abstract

Since its original description in 1908, Coats disease has been recognized as an idiopathic cause of severe vision loss with a remarkable diversity in clinical presentation and morphology. Key clinical and imaging variables are helpful in differentiating Coats disease from life-threatening malignancies, and proper management revolves around a thorough knowledge of the differential diagnosis. Despite significant advancement in scientific understanding of the disease process and clinical spectrum, the underlying etiology remains obscure, and both primary and secondary forms are recognized. With the development of anti-VEGF therapy, vitreoretinal specialists have a new, effective adjunct to the clinical management of exudates, macular edema, and serous retinal detachment. We highlight the history, diagnostic challenges, evolving clinical spectrum, and current management of Coats disease.

KEYWORDS:

Coats disease; Leber multiple miliary aneurysms; intravitreal bevacizumab; retinal vascular disease; type 1 idiopathic macular telangiectasia

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center