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JACC Cardiovasc Imaging. 2013 Oct;6(10):1087-1094. doi: 10.1016/j.jcmg.2013.03.009.

Relationship of serum inflammatory biomarkers with plaque inflammation assessed by FDG PET/CT: the dal-PLAQUE study.

Author information

1
Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York.
2
George Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.
3
F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., Basel, Switzerland.
4
Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York.
5
Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
6
Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York; Peter Munk Cardiac Centre and Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
8
Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York; Cardiovascular Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York. Electronic address: zahi.fayad@mssm.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study sought to longitudinally investigate the relationship between a broad spectrum of serum inflammatory biomarkers and plaque inflammation assessed by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT).

BACKGROUND:

Both plaque inflammation and serum biomarkers of inflammation are associated with atherothrombotic events; however, the relationship between them is unclear.

METHODS:

We conducted a post hoc analysis of the dal-PLAQUE (A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Study of the Effect of RO4607381 on Progression or Regression of Atherosclerotic Plaque in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease [CHD] Including Patients With Other CHD Risk Factors), a randomized, placebo-controlled study of dalcetrapib, a cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitor, in 130 patients with coronary heart disease, or coronary heart disease risk equivalents on stable lipid-lowering therapy. Baseline and change after 3-month follow-up in inflammatory biomarker levels and baseline and change after 3-month follow-up in aorta and carotid (18)F-FDG PET/CT (mean maximum target-to-background ratio of the most diseased segment [TBRmds]) were analyzed.

RESULTS:

Baseline myeloperoxidase positively correlated with baseline carotid TBRmds (rho = 0.25, p = 0.02). This correlation remained at the 3-month follow-up and was independent of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors. Baseline lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 mass correlated with aorta TBRmds (rho = 0.21, p = 0.03). However, this correlation disappeared at the 3-month follow-up and was not independent of cardiovascular disease risk factors. There was no association between change from baseline in myeloperoxidase or lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 mass and change from baseline in aorta and carotid TBRmds. Baseline and change from baseline in high sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, soluble P-selectin, soluble E-selectin, soluble intracellular adhesion molecule 1, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, and matrix-metalloproteinase 3 and 9 did not correlate with baseline or change from baseline in carotid or aorta TBRmds.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our data show that, in patients with coronary heart disease or at high risk of coronary heart disease on stable lipid-lowering therapy, circulating myeloperoxidase levels are associated with carotid plaque inflammation. (A Randomized, Placebo-controlled Study of the Effect of RO4607381 on Progression or Regression of Atherosclerotic Plaque in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease [CHD] Including Patients With Other CHD Risk Factors [dal-PLAQUE]; NCT00655473).

KEYWORDS:

(18)F-FDG PET/CT; IL-6; Lp-PLA(2); MMP; MPO; TBR(mds); atherosclerosis; fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 positron emission tomography; fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 positron emission tomography/computed tomography; high-sensitivity C-reactive protein; hsCRP; inflammatory biomarkers; interleukin 6; lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2); matrix metalloproteinase; myeloperoxidase; sE-selectin; sICAM; sP-selectin; sVCAM; soluble E-selectin; soluble P-selectin; soluble intracellular adhesion molecule; soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule; target-to-background ratio of the most diseased segment

PMID:
24135322
PMCID:
PMC3831277
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcmg.2013.03.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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