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Am J Public Health. 2014 Sep;104(9):1783-7. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2013.301368. Epub 2013 Oct 17.

25-Hydroxyvitamin D in the range of 20 to 100 ng/mL and incidence of kidney stones.

Author information

1
Stacie Nguyen, Leo Baggerly, and Christine French are with GrassrootsHealth, Encinitas, CA. Robert P. Heaney is with Creighton University, Osteoporosis Research Center, Omaha, NE. Edward D. Gorham and Cedric F. Garland are with the Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Increasing 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum levels can prevent a wide range of diseases. There is a concern about increasing kidney stone risk with vitamin D supplementation. We used GrassrootsHealth data to examine the relationship between vitamin D status and kidney stone incidence.

METHODS:

The study included 2012 participants followed prospectively for a median of 19 months. Thirteen individuals self-reported kidney stones during the study period. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to assess the association between vitamin D status and kidney stones.

RESULTS:

We found no statistically significant association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and kidney stones (P = .42). Body mass index was significantly associated with kidney stone risk (odds ratio = 3.5; 95% confidence interval = 1.1, 11.3).

CONCLUSIONS:

We concluded that a serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level of 20 to 100 nanograms per milliliter has no significant association with kidney stone incidence.

PMID:
24134366
PMCID:
PMC4151925
DOI:
10.2105/AJPH.2013.301368
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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