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Am J Addict. 2013 Nov-Dec;22(6):574-80. doi: 10.1111/j.1521-0391.2013.12024.x. Epub 2013 Apr 11.

Clinician beliefs and attitudes about buprenorphine/naloxone diversion.

Author information

1
Harvard Medical School, McLean Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts; Harvard/MGH Center for Addiction Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

Concern about diversion of buprenorphine/naloxone (B/N) in the United States may affect prescribing patterns and policy decisions. This study examines addiction treatment clinician beliefs and attitudes regarding B/N diversion.

METHODS:

Participants (n = 369) completed a 34-item survey in 2010 during two national symposia on opioid dependence. We conducted multivariable regression, examining the relationship of perceived danger from B/N diversion with clinician characteristics and their beliefs about B/N treatment and diversion. We compared causal beliefs about diversion among clinicians with and without B/N treatment experience.

RESULTS:

Forty percent of clinicians believed that B/N diversion is a dangerous problem. The belief that B/N diversion increases accidental overdoses in the community was strongly associated with perceived danger from B/N diversion.

CONCLUSIONS AND SCIENTIFIC SIGNIFICANCE:

Attitudes and beliefs, not education level, were associated with clinician's perceived danger from B/N diversion. Clinicians with greater B/N patient experience were more likely to believe treatment access barriers are the major cause of B/N diversion.

PMID:
24131165
PMCID:
PMC3801272
DOI:
10.1111/j.1521-0391.2013.12024.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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