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Eur J Clin Nutr. 2013 Dec;67(12):1328-30. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2013.204. Epub 2013 Oct 16.

Short sleep duration is associated with a lower mean satiety quotient in overweight and obese men.

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1
Behavioral and Metabolic Research Unit, School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

We examined satiety quotient (SQ) and energy intake (EI) according to sleep duration, quality and timing. Seventy-five overweight/obese men (age: 41.1±5.8 years; body mass index: 33.6±2.9 kg/m(2)) completed visual analogue scales for appetite sensations before, immediately after and every 10 minutes for 1 hour following a standardized breakfast. The mean SQ (primary outcome of the study) was calculated from four appetite sensations. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index identified short-duration (<7 h/night) and 'recommended sleep duration' (7 h/night) sleepers, poor (score 5)- and good (score <5)-quality sleepers and late (midpoint of sleep >0230 hours) and early (midpoint of sleep 0230 hours) sleepers. A 3-day food record and buffet-style meal assessed the EI. Short-duration sleepers had a lower mean SQ compared with recommended sleep duration sleepers (6.5±4.9 vs 8.8±4.3 mm/100 kcal; P=0.04). The mean SQ between poor and good (6.9±4.6 vs 8.7±4.6 mm/100 kcal; P=0.11) and that between early and late (8.99±5.10 vs 9.32±4.02 mm/100 kcal; P=0.78) sleepers were not significantly different. EI did not differ between the sleep groups. Thus, short-duration sleepers had a lower mean SQ compared with recommended sleep duration sleepers. However, this did not coincide with an increased EI.

PMID:
24129360
DOI:
10.1038/ejcn.2013.204
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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